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Why Developing Your Team Matters

If you’ve ever thought about giving up on training and developing your team, don’t. Discover why developing your team matters to your ministry’s success.


Great teams translate into great experiences for families in your ministry. Sure, it may be easier to recruit, do background checks, and give volunteers their assignments, then step aside to focus on your next event or simply go in your office and close the door. But great teams aren’t built this way. You must keep work continually to develop and invest in your team. But don’t fret—it really is the small things that make the biggest difference.

  • Use strategic communication. Your volunteers have a lot of information coming at them. Communicate—but don’t overdo it. Too much communication dilutes the important things you need to share.
  • Thank each volunteer every week. Look people in the eye before they leave and personally thank them.
  • Use grace, not pressure. Your volunteers lead busy lives completely outside of ministry. Things will happen. When they can’t serve, be understanding.
  • Train in small bites. Rather than asking your team to show up for long, unnecessary meetings, find creative ways to convey the knowledge you need to so it isn’t a burden.
  • Make yourself accessible. Give volunteers your personal cell phone number. Answer questions on the spot or get back to volunteers within 24 hours.
  • Keep the culture enjoyable. Your attitude is contagious. Stay positive and upbeat.
  • Serve your volunteers when they serve. See yourself as a flight attendant. Spend your mornings moving from room to room to meet your team’s needs.
  • Get to know your volunteers. Know what’s going on in their lives. Call them just to see how they’re doing.
  • Show you care. Give back to your team. Bring cookies and treats for the team on weekends.
  • Listen a lot more than you talk. When people know you really listen, they’ll give you access to their heart.
  • Connect volunteers with each other. Help build relationships among the people volunteers serve alongside. When people develop a relationship with others they serve with, they’ll stay.
  • Keep love as a top priority. Ensure your team knows you love them just as they are. Above all else—love them!

 

Dale Hudson is the children’s pastor at Christ Fellowship in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, and is the co-author of 100 Best Ideas to Turbocharge Your Children’s Ministry (group.com).


2 thoughts on “Why Developing Your Team Matters

  1. Avatar

    I’ve been thinking about having a team to work with. It sounds fantastic actually. I have some questions about starting a team approach.
    I serve in a church where there are about 85 kids. We have Sunday school and a midweek kids club for our community. How many people should I have on my team? Should they be the same or different people then those who volunteer in Children’s ministry? What kind of roles would they fill? I mostly would like to have someone to talk through ideas with. I need some help in this area – please direct me.

    • Avatar
      Christine Yount Jones

      Krista, these are great questions! When I’ve formed a team in the past, I invited everyone I believed would be interested in being on the team–whether they served currently in children’s ministry or not. Then I shared with them my vision and asked them to pray about being involved. The team became smaller over time because some didn’t feel led. Then I nurtured that team and met with them regularly. Does this help?

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Why Developing Your Team Matters

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